Walter Moss

Walter G. Moss is a professor emeritus of history at Eastern Michigan University. His most recent book is An Age of Progress?: Clashing Twentieth-Century Global Forces (2008). For a list of all his recent books and online publications, including many on Russian history and culture, go here: http://people.emich.edu/wmoss/pub.htm

Terrorism, Patriotism, War, and Cultural Identity

Terrorism Patriotism War

Walter Moss: In Moral Imagination’s dozen essays David Bromwich focuses on important topics: terrorism and war, patriotism, cultural identity, 9/11, the American character, Abraham Lincoln, Edward Snowden and the decline of privacy, and the arrogance of U.S. foreign policy as demonstrated by Dick Cheney and others.

Where Is the Passion for Peace?

Ukraine Peace Talks

Walter Moss: Today, as conflicts and bloodshed occur in Ukraine (and Gaza, Syria, and elsewhere), we wonder why in the past century we have advanced so little in our ability to prevent such senseless wars.

What New US-Russia Relationship Could Look Like

Russia US Relations

Walter Moss: A new Russia policy is necessary not only because of the present tensions surrounding Russian-Ukrainian relations—important as they are—and because our adversarial relationship is hurting us in many ways , but also because our relations with Russia remains vital to our global interests.

Aging: Myths, Reality, and Nonsense

Myths about Aging

Walter Moss: We are not doing anyone—ourselves or members of younger generations—any good by equating old with bad and young with good. Every age has its plusses and minuses and should be embraced with all the joy and aliveness we can muster.

How We Got It Wrong with Russia

Diplomacy with Russia

Walter Moss: Is it not now time for the USA, a country that prides itself on innovation, to come up with its own new-thinking foreign policy, at least in regard to Russia?

What’s Next? The Ukrainian Crisis 2.0

Ukrainian Crisis

Walter Moss: The top priority for many Ukrainians, west and east, is overcoming economic misery and political corruption and unresponsiveness to their problems. And Poroshenko has recognized that unemployment and poverty have exacerbated discontent in the east and elsewhere.

Politics and Humor: Reflections on Robert Gates’s Duty

Robert Gates

Walter Moss: “I think a sense of humor and a sense of the absurd reflects a balance and a perspective on the world that is very healthy. Of all the presidents that I worked for, there are only two who had no discernible sense of humor: Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter. I rest my case.”

Russia and the U.S.: The Limits of Partnership

U.S. Relations with Russia

Walter Moss: The main stumbling block preventing closer ties has not been any bad personal chemistry, but the legacy of Cold-War and 1990s suspicions and resentments.

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