Defense

The Military Industrial Complex is a term coined by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to describe the web of policies and monetary relationships between legislators, national armed forces, and the military industrial base. The articles in this category address the relationship between our legislators and the lucrative defense contract industry.

Doom from the Depths

Nuclear-Armed Submarines

Lawrence Wittner: Taxpayers, particularly, might be concerned about the unprecedented expense of this new submarine fleet. According to most estimates, building the 12 SSBN(X) submarines will cost about $100 billion.

The Limits of Military Power

Is Military Power Useful

Lawrence Wittner: The lengthy and costly Vietnam War led to a humiliating defeat for the United States — not because the U.S. government lacked enormous military advantages, but because, ultimately, the determination of the Vietnamese to gain control of their own country proved more powerful than U.S. weaponry.

The CIA’s Memory Prison

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JP Sottile: Essentially, the memories of their treatment by the CIA have become the proprietary possession of the CIA. It is the ultimate application of “national security” as a legal fig leaf.

Kill Wasteful Missile Defense Efforts

star wars

Ivan Eland: This government “Star Wars” effort has been a boondoggle, but then huge costs and poor performance rarely cause any government program to be terminated—evidence of this effect is exhibited by the continued flow of money to the project despite three decades of failure.

Lockheed Martin at the Trough

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Lawrence Wittner: At the very time when (thanks to sequestration) state governments are cutting back aid to low-income women and their children, the government of the State of Maryland seems en route to providing the Lockheed Martin Corporation with a handout worth millions of dollars.

Kerry, Powell, Hagel

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Brent Budowsky: The partial list of Republicans, career diplomats and nonpartisan military leaders that I emphasize here as Hagel supporters speaks volumes about the bipartisan security tradition that Colin Powell, John Kerry and Chuck Hagel represent.

Cut Carriers Now

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Ivan Eland: With yawning American budget deficits and a $15 trillion national debt, it would save significant amounts of money to reduce the number of carriers and carrier air wings well below the excessive 11 and 10, respectively.