Overpopulation and Related Matters

Emily Spence: Why, why have human population numbers been exploding during my lifetime without the attention of every expert on the planet being focused upon this question?

On 10-10-10 Fight Big Oil and Big Coal

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Lauren Steiner: Stand up and be counted at rallies and public hearings. Make telephone calls, sign petitions and write letters to public officials and newspapers and get your friends to do the same. Like Gandhi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” There is so much you can do. Learn more here.

Mary Landrieu Goes to Bat for Louisiana’s Wetlands

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Georgianne Nienaber: Landrieu did not mince words, blaming the federal government for malfeasance and mismanagement of a delicate ecosystem that has placed the Mississippi River Delta at “extreme risk of complete and utter collapse.”

We Shouldn’t Have to Pay for PG&E’s Mistakes

Paul Hogarth: The problem is not just compensation to those whose lives were destroyed. It’s about repairing the infrastructure that PG&E neglected for decades.

Fatal Pipeline Accident Turns Attention to Nation’s Aging Pipelines

The remains of a gas line lie on the ground after an explosion September 10, 2010 in San Bruno, California. (Photo by Eric Risberg-Pool/Getty Images)

Marian Wang: More than 60 percent of the nation’s gas pipelines are 40 years or older, AP reports. And age isn’t the only issue. Older pipelines are often configured in such a way that they’re unable to accommodate the latest pipeline safety technology.

Another Oil Rig Explodes in the Gulf of Mexico!

Oil Rig Explosion

ANOTHER !! Oil Rig Explosion in the Gulf of Mexico National Public Radio, the New York Times, CNN and other media outlets are reporting that another offshore oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico.  According to the reports, the explosion occurred 80 miles off the coast of Louisiana, just east of the Deepwater Horizon […]

What’s the Deal With the Water in Orange Beach Alabama?

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Georgianne Nienaber: There is no doubt that BP lied about the amount of oil being spewed into the Gulf of Mexico from Day One, no doubt that the EPA has obfuscated issues surrounding the use of the chemical dispersant, Corexit, and no doubt that bloggers have gone entirely beyond the tenets of responsible journalism.

Californians Need to Say NO to Big Oil

Tracy Emblem: Implementing clean energy in California now – not twenty years from now – is a not only a public health issue — it’s a matter of economic survival.

Gulf’s Dolphins: “Man Needs To Make Right Their Waters”

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Georgianne Nienaber: Scientists suggest that it will be many years before we know the full extent of the disaster, and are wary of reporters since the media ends up misquoting them or distorting the facts. It is not so much media bias as it is lack of scientific training on the part of journalists and bloggers.

Obama Admin: No More Regulatory Shortcuts for Deepwater Drilling Projects

Marian Wang: The Obama administration announced Monday that it is no longer fast-tracking offshore drilling projects in deep water by exempting them from detailed environmental review.

Where’s the Oil? Here, There, and Everywhere

Thick oil is revealed on the beach at Grand Isle's State Park after clean up crews use an auger to take 30 inch deep core samples that show oil from the deepwater horizon oil spill exists on several levels beneath the sand.

Georgianne Nienaber: The world faces the difficult challenge of understanding exactly what has happened to the ecosystem of the Gulf of Mexico in the uncertainty of the aftermath of the April 20 explosion of the BP Macondo wellhead.

Saving the Earth for Our Grandchildren

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Steve Hochstadt: Until recently, nobody knew that the unprecedented wealth of American society carried extreme dangers for our own future. Our modern lifestyles of consumption are slowly killing the planet.

Voices from the Wetlands

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In “Voices from the Wetlands,” veteran reporter Georgianne Nienaber gives a first-hand account of the damage wrecked by the BP oil well disaster on the Louisiana Delta and on the people whose families have lived there for centuries.

Baby Steps in Plastic Bags

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Dick Price: But what if all hundred people at my workplace followed suit? That’s 50,000 plastic bags per year that wouldn’t be fouling the environment. Or the 800 members of my church? Another 400,000 bags not killing wildlife. All 10 million LA County residents? Five billion bags. All Californians? That’s 19 billion bags—and now e’re waist deep in the Big Plastic.

Toxic Oil Sludge Is Good as Gold for Republicans

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Jerry Drucker: The gloomy, ghastly, glutted, gutted Gulf will not be able to supply many millions of Americans with food, or clean and healthy resort beach fronts, or Gulf businesses, perhaps for decades. What’s the solution to this mega problem?

Macondo Wellhead Flyover: Damage Control at The Source

Schumaker on Mission Credit: onwingsofcare.org

Georgianne Nienaber: New Orleans film producer Bess Carrick wanted to see what the Gulf of Mexico looked like in the 48 miles between the tip of the Mississippi Delta and the blown Macondo wellhead for a series she is producing called The Barataria Chronicles.

BP’s Final Lesson

bp earnings report

Robert Reich: If BP emerges from this debacle fatter and happier than anyone imagined a few months ago, whatever happened to the idea of corporate accountability? Does this mean any giant corporation can wreak havoc and then get back to business as usual?

Saving Water, One Drop at a Time

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Steve Hochstadt: Americans use more water per capita than any other nation. Every time we flush the toilet, we use as much water as the average person in the developing world employs for an entire day’s cooking, cleaning, and drinking.

Gulf Fisheries Opened: Safe or BP Politics, PR and Sock Puppetry?

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Georgianne Nienaber: Is the Obama administration and BP engaging in politics and PR with a dangerous twist?

Fishing and Breathing BP’s Oil: What’s “Safe?”

West Side of Pier-Wide Shot Copyright June 7, 2010 Nick Zantop

Georgianne Nienaber: o one knows for certain what are “safe” levels of dispersants, oil, and VOCs in the air and water. There was no baseline to begin with, agencies are overlapping or not doing their jobs, and there are still 80 days worth of oil and dispersants in the Gulf to contend with.

Gulf Oil Disaster: A Tragedy of the Commons

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Donald Price: The Tragedy of the Commons teaches us that private companies can’t regulate themselves because this eventually leads to the tragedies we see in the Gulf of Mexico and the financial tragedies in the global economy.

BP’s Oiled Pelicans: “They Look Like Dead Angels in the Sand”

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Georgianne Nienaber: Rehabilitation of wildlife has become a moneymaking government enabled bureaucracy with a bunch of federal sock-puppets taking orders from BP.

Open Web Platform for Gulf Oil Spill Beats Media Boom Ban

Yobie Benjamin with Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu

Georgianne Nienaber: Shortly after the Transocean/Deepwater Horizon wellhead exploded, Benjamin assembled a volunteer group of technology and web design experts, journalists, legal and business professionals and ordinary individuals who wanted to help with the spill crisis.

Winona LaDuke Pledges Help for Native Tribes Facing BP Oil

Winona LaDuke at White Earth Reservation

Georgianne Nienaber: LaDuke slammed the Minnesota Ottertail Power Company for being “punitive” in its refusal to allow the White Earth Recovery Project to supply its own power and have some to sell to the rest of the grid. Minnesota has the strictest electrical inspection standards in the United States.

EPA, Coast Guard, and BP PR Tied to Airborne Corexit Denials

gulf spill map

Georgianne Nienaber: So, dispersants are clearly present in the air, both over sea and land. If Unified Command is suggesting that oil spill responders might want to reconsider using respirators, why have we been told by the EPA, at a press conference, that there are no dispersants in the air?

Facing the Future as a Media Felon on the Gulf Coast

Copyright Jerry Moran

Georgianne Nienaber: The United States Coast Guard considers me a felon now, because I “willfully” want to obtain more photos like these to show you the utter devastation occurring in Barataria Bay, Louisiana as a result of the BP oil catastrophe.

Media Contributes to Victim Mentality as Gulf Struggles

Grand Bayou, Louisiana, at risk

Georgianne Nienaber: Journalists have a responsibility to examine the science and it will not be easy. The public has a responsibility to learn more about their environment. It is obvious that government is not looking out for Gulf Coast residents. Communities will be forced to step in and do independent monitoring.

Images in the Sand Connect Our Global Community

venice protest

Linda Milazzo: We who are selfish, who sacrifice our planet to fulfill desires not related to sustainment, are earth-perps. Every drowned polar bear incriminates us. Every oil asphyxiated dolphin, pelican and turtle inculpates us. Every decapitated mountain besmirches us. Every toxic landfill debases us.

How Big Oil Controlled the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry

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Tracy Emblem: Big Oil bought and controlled the alternative energy business because Big Oil’s main business is and has always been oil, gas, coal and petrochemical profits first. The “private sector” stimulated was the mergers and buy-outs of smaller photovoltaic research and development companies by Big Oil companies.

Oil-Soaked Dolphins Struggle in Lousiana’s Barataria Bay

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Georgianne Nienaber: Toxic poisons are stalking the dolphins in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, and no one is discussing or reporting the fact that the oiled mammals are struggling in the waters near Grand Terre Island. There are no published photos or videos that we have been able to find, and no stories that describe the oil-encrusted dorsal fins and odd behavior that suggest an under-reported or deliberately hidden environmental catastrophe.

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