Fracking Money for California State Senators

Five days after a bill calling for a moratorium on fracking in California failed in the State Senate, a nonpartisan watchdog group revealed that those who voted against the legislation or abstained from voting on it received many times more in campaign contributions from the oil and gas industry than those who supported the bill.

State Senators voting ‘NO’ on the fracking moratorium bill on Thursday, May 29 received 14 times as much money the oil and gas industry, on average ($25,227), as senators voting ‘YES’ ($1,772) from January 1, 2009 to December 21, 2012, according to MapLight, a non profit organization revealing money’s influence on politics.

The report also said the Democrats who abstained from voting on the moratorium received, on average, 4.5 times as much money from the oil and gas industry as the Democrats who voted ‘YES’.

Under intense pressure from the Western States Petroleum Association, Chevron, Occidental Petroleum and other oil companies, the Senate failed to pass Senate Bill 1132.

Under intense pressure from the Western States Petroleum Association, Chevron, Occidental Petroleum and other oil companies, the Senate failed to pass Senate Bill 1132, legislation that would have placed a moratorium on oil and gas well stimulation treatments, including hydraulic and acid fracturing, until the government completes a scientific study of the practices’ impacts on human and environmental health. The bill was authored by Senators Holly Mitchell and Mark Leno.

The final vote was 16-16, with eight Senators not voting. Twenty-one votes were required for the bill to pass. Three of those with no vote recorded – Leland Yee, Rod Wright and Ron Calderon – have been suspended from the Senate due to corruption allegations.

“If the five active senators who abstained from voting -all Democrats-voted in favor, the moratorium would have passed,” according to a statement from MapLight. “The Democrats who abstained from voting on the moratorium have received, on average, 4.5 times as much money from the oil and gas industry as the Democrats who voted ‘YES’.”

Senator Jeanne Fuller (R), who received $52,300 from the oil and gas industry, more than any other senator voting on the bill, voted ‘NO’.

Fuller is known not only for her big contributions from the oil and gas industry but from corporate agribusiness in Kern County. It was Fuller who sponsored legislation to eradicate striped bass in the Bay-Delta estuary, a bill that failed twice due to massive opposition by recreational anglers and grassroots environmentalists.

The oil industry contributions to the Senators voting NO were as follows:

  • Joel Anderson (R) $18,750
  • Tom Berryhill (R): $15,000
  • Anthony Cannella (R): $40,150
  • Lou Correa (D): $11,350
  • Jeanne Fuller (R): $52,300
  • Ted Gaines (R): $27,250
  • Cathleen Galgiani (D): $24,950
  • Ed Hernandez (D): $23,250
  • Bob Huff (R): $45,550
  • Steve Knight (R): $24,050
  • Mike Morrell (R): $19,300
  • Norma Torres (D): $13,250
  • Mimi Walters (R): $51,000
  • Mark Wyland (R) – $12,250

When one adds in the oil industry contributions for 2013, the campaign contributions mushroom. For example, Fuller received $76,850 from 2009 to 2013, while Galgiani received $47,600.

When one adds in the oil industry contributions for 2013, the campaign contributions mushroom. For example, Fuller received $76,850 from 2009 to 2013, while Galgiani received $47,600.

The oil and gas industry contributions to those Democrats who abstained from voting were as follows:

  • Marty Block: $2,000
  • Jerry Hill: $3,950
  • Ben Hueso: $12,400
  • Ricardo Lara: $21,300
  • Richard Roth: $ 0

dan bacherThe MapLight analysis of campaign contributions from PACs and employees of oil and gas interests to legislators in office on day of vote was during the period from January 1, 2009 – December 31, 2012. The National Institute of Money in State Politics was the data source for the campaign contributions.

Dan Bacher
Fish Sniffer

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Comments

  1. Stephen Murray says

    The individual contributions leave an easily traceable trail of money to
    votes. Harder to gauge are the lobbying dollars. The group Californians
    Against Fracking — which includes 350.org, the Center for Biological
    Diversity, and Oil Change International — estimates $15 million has been
    spent altogether on lobbying activities to specifically defeat SB 1132.

  2. harry says

    Why would anyone think I would give money to a congress person who voted against how I had asked such congress person to vote? No congress person of any party would think that way. I would think the giver of the money gave it to a person he/she thought was going to vote as the giver had asked. Did this article writer think otherwise?

  3. walter brasch says

    Ah, these California politicians are minor league, compared to the money thrown around and to Pa. legislators by the oil/gas lobby. The gov. has accepted over $3 million; Republican leaders in lebgis;latuire have received 5 and even 6-figure contributions. These Californians should plan a junket to harrisburg, Pa., and learn how to get contributions!
    walt brasch (author: FRACKING PENNSYLVANIA)

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