Obama Should Copy JFK’s First Days in Office and Fight Hunger

poverty in americaHunger is on the offensive, even in the United States.  The Department of Agriculture reports that 49 million Americans struggle to get food.  Worldwide, nearly one billion people suffer from hunger, and child malnutrition is rampant in East Africa, Afghanistan, Yemen and many other areas.

President Obama and the Congress, as they grapple with the federal budget, also need to protect the hungry.  They can take a page from President John F. Kennedy’s playbook for his first days in office, back in 1961.

Kennedy’s first act as president was to order food aid to hungry people in the U.S., particularly in West Virginia.  Unemployment was high, and it was critical that food support be given during a time of great strain on the people there.  Kennedy’s plan involved distribution of food stamps to the needy.  And it worked.

Kennedy reported on this aid in 1962, stating, “Low income families are receiving better diets…Retail food store sales in these areas increased 8 percent in dollar volume.  There have been savings in distribution costs and benefits to the economy of the food stamp communities.”

Also the Kennedy administration worked on improvements to the national school feeding program.  This is a vital safety net to ensure that children in impoverished families do not suffer from lack of nutrition.

Today, protection is needed for families all across America, where unemployment rates are skyrocketing.  Demand for food banks is growing.  Many Americans face a struggle to afford food.  But support from the federal government is dwindling, with programs like the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) facing reduced funding levels.  Emergency food banks across the country count on TEFAP for supplies.

Vicki Escarra of Feeding America says, “As Congress and the administration look for ways to reduce the federal deficit, it is more critical than ever to protect funding for nutrition programs that provide the first line of defense against hunger in America.”

President Obama and the Congress should expand food aid for hungry Americans.  Programs like TEFAP, food stamps, the national school lunch program, including summer feeding, need to be emphasized.  Like JFK on his first days, they need to do what is right for the American people.

But also like JFK, Obama and Congress have to think globally and consider our national security interests abroad.  Fighting hunger overseas is an essential part of our foreign policy.  JFK realized this.  His predecessor, Dwight Eisenhower knew this when he signed Public Law 480, which became known as Food for Peace.  This program is the primary tool for the U.S. in fighting hunger abroad.

President Kennedy, in his second executive order, created a White House office for Food for Peace.  This bolstered the existing program and made fighting hunger a top priority, where it also needs to be now.

Today, the U.S. should expand its food for peace program, not reduce funding as proposed in budgets put forward by Congress earlier this year.  Hunger-fighting initiatives are relatively inexpensive and do not contribute to our debt problems.  Moreover, they are essential in terms of promoting stability and economic development abroad.

The U.S. simply cannot afford to retreat from fighting the menace of hunger.  There is tremendous suffering ongoing in East Africa in the famine and drought zone.  In Afghanistan, where we are trying to win the peace, a hunger crisis is growing, and food aid programs face huge budget shortfalls.  Likewise, in Yemen hunger is on the rise while the World Food Programme and UNICEF remain low on funds to combat the scourge.

One area where the U.S. really needs to step up is in child feeding.  When Kennedy became president, he named George McGovern the Food for Peace Director.  McGovern led a vigorous campaign against hunger, including school meals for millions of children in Brazil, South Korea, India, Poland and other countries.  Many of these nations developed their own national school feeding program from this effort.

Today, we need that same kind of resolve as funding for school lunch programs in developing countries remains low.  In Afghanistan, for instance, reduced funding for the World Food Programme forced about 500,000 children to lose their school meal ration.  That is hardly an epitome of a reconstruction going well.

william lambersIn Haiti, support for school feeding is critical to turning the corner on rebuilding the country from the earthquake.  We do not want to cut funding now.  Food for Peace as well as the McGovern-Dole school lunch program need increased funding.

Food aid programs have historically received bipartisan support.  They should today as well.  For the future of the United States and that of other countries rests on the most basic foundation–food and nutrition.  Food for Peace must remain a top priority for the current government as it was the day President Kennedy took office fifty years ago.

William Lambers
History News Network

William Lambers is the author of the book “Ending World Hunger” and numerous articles on global hunger.

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