Vodou’s Acceptance of Gays

Erzulie Dantor

Rev. Irene Monroe: Misconstrued by racist images, of zombies rising from graves, jungle drums, orgiastic ceremonies ritualizing malevolent powers of black magic, and engaging in cannibalism, by today’s popular culture images courtesy of Hollywood’s and New Orleans’ tourism industries, Vodou is a persecuted religion.

Womanist and Saying Who We Are

Pat Parker

Rev. Irene Monroe: The secular use of “womanist” is by African-American women who have either left the Black Church because of its gender bias and homophobia, or who do not come from the Black Church religious experience. These women use the term to identify a culturally specific form of women-centered politics and theory.

LA Progressive: 1 August to 7 August, 2010

Articles by Robert Reich, Andrea Nill, John Peeler, Anthony Samad, Tina Dupuy, Rev. Irene Monroe, Sikivu Hutchinson, Steve Hochstadt, Berry Craig, Michael Sigman, Dick Price, Paul Loeb, Paul Hogarth, Ron Wolff, Mark Naison, Randy Shaw, Marcus Stern, Ed Rampell, Matthew Kavanagh, Sharon Kyle, Sylvia Moore, Tom Hall, Berry Craig, Ed Rampell, Mike Price, Seth Hoy, Pete Daniel, Tom Degan, and Joel K. Goldstein

Essence Magazine’s True Color

essence magazine

Rev. Irene Monroe: There has been a color change at Essence. After forty years of having sisters from the African Diaspora as its fashion directors, the new one — Ellianna Placas — is white. And the news is sending seismic shock waves to many of its subscribers here in the U.S. and across the globe.

Black Gays Invited to White House

Sharon J. Letterman, NBJC's new Executive Director

Rev. Irene Monroe: Just as my enslaved ancestors could have never imagined an African American family residing in the White House, nor could my African American LGBTQ brothers and sisters who fought in the Stonewall Riots of 1969 in New York’s Greenwich Village imagine that one day a special invitation from the White House would openly welcome us in.

Black History and the Progression of the Black Community

bethune1

Candidly speaking, the need for a black history month would not exist if the American halls of academe did not use systematic exploitation (past and present) to minimize exposure to African-American history. The city school systems, colleges, universities, and the media are by-products of Eurocentric educational philosophies. These systems were designed to teach African-Americans to [...]