My Vision for Revitalizing Public Education

Mark Naison: I think you begin with creating a child-friendly environment. That means sharply reducing the number of tests, leaving ample room for exercise and play, giving primacy to the arts, and having instructions in subject areas, when possible, incorporate hands-on learning and project based activity.

The Army Occupying America’s Public Schools

michelle rhee

Mark Naison: Many teachers, parents, union leaders, and school administrators secretly despise the policies being imposed on them; but see no way off opposing them with sacrificing their careers or children’s welfare.

Obama Forced Out on Gay Marriage

obama evolves on gay marriage

Rev. Irene Monroe: There’s one thing that has always irked me about Obama’s evolutionary narrative on same-sex marriage—and that’s not his position on it per se so much as the insincerity of his homophobia.

Education Reformers and “The New Jim Crow”

school hallway

Mark Naison: Current school reform policies represent a brilliant tactic to avoid dealing with the real causes of poverty and inequality in society, while finding a convenient scapegoat in public school teachers and their unions.

Teachers Demand Arne Duncan’s Removal

arne duncan

Mark Naison: We, the undersigned, a cross section of the nation’s teachers and their supporters, wish to express our extreme displeasure with the policies implemented during your administration by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

White House Continues Drumbeat for DREAM

white house

Seth Hoy: Yet even with the weight of the White House and a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) score that has DREAM reducing the deficit by $1.4 billion over ten years, Republican votes may be short.

Recession Is Over! (If You Want It)

combat

Joseph Palermo: The National Bureau of Economic Research tells us the Great Recession is “over.” The only thing this announcement reveals is just how out of touch and compassionless those who view human society through the lens of quantitative measurements can be.

University of Phoenix: Right Out of David Mamet

Education Refor

Joseph Palermo: Any institution that calls itself a “university” yet tells its enrollment officers to “burrow” down deep into the “pain” of its students with the aim of hooking them into government-subsidized debt to rake in the profits not only doesn’t deserve to be accredited, but should be barred from having any access to federal student aid programs.

LA Progressive: July 4 to 10, 2010

Articles by Tom Hall, Joseph Palermo, David Love, John MacMurray, Georgianne Nienaber, Ed Rampell, Mario Solis-Marich, Randy Shaw, Randal Jelks, H. Scott Prosterman, Carl Bloice, Ron Wolff, Jasmyne Cannick, Steve Hochstadt, Anthony Samad, Michael Sigman, Paul Hogarth, Rev. Irene Monroe, Wayne Williams, Andrea Nill, Tina Dupuy, Sylvia Moore, Adam Eran, Robert Reich, Simon Balto, Norman Solomon, Wade Graham, Michele Waslin, Berry Craig, Joseph Palermo, and Sharon Kyle

Margaret Spellings, Arne Duncan — What’s the Difference?

Joseph Palermo: Nobody in power seems to be listening to what teachers have to say about how best to improve public education. The Administration is telling teachers that all those envelopes they licked, and all those doors they knocked on, and all those phone calls they made to help elect Obama in 2008 were nothing but a goddamned waste of time.

LA Progressive: 23 to 29 May 2010 Articles

Articles by Patrick Henningsen, Tom Hall, David Swanson, Randy Shaw, Irene Monroe, Paul Hogarth, Norman Solomon, Tracy Emblem, Andrea Nill, Michele Waslin, Michael Sigman, Linda Milazzo, Sharon Kyle, Walter Moss, Mike Price, K. Danielle Edwards, Brad Parker, Michele Waslin, David Love, Tina Dupuy, Michael Sigman, Joseph Palermo, Robert Reich, Carl Bloice, Anthony Asadullah Samad, Diane Lefer, and Adam Eran

The Otherworldly Attack on Public Education

arne duncan

Carl Bloice: Why is it that the richest, most powerful nation on the planet, one that produces more and more billionaires each year and can spend one million dollars each on the soldiers it sends off to war, can’t afford to educate its kids? It remains a mystery to me that an administration that can spend millions of dollars to bribe states into facilitating its quite controversial school “reform” programs can’t come up with the resources to stave off the pending mass layoffs of teachers.

Financial Reform Too Small to Succeed

wall street reform

Joseph Palermo: The financial reform legislation currently winding its way through the Congress is a step in the right direction but it retains too much of the status quo that brought down the economy in the first place. The key problem, as many economists have been telling us, is that the top financial institutions remain “too big to fail.” Congress can enact all the regulations it wishes but even the best written rules won’t be enough to prevent another financial meltdown.

The Looming Educational Catastrophe is Scary. Indeed.

Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa)

Carl Bloice–September is four months away and one thing is certain: the public is not be adequately alerted to the seriousness of the situation and mobilized to do anything about it. We would know far less about how critical things are in the schools had not students in California – where thing are really rough – set off nationwide protests about the cutbacks. And, as soon as that happened, on cue, voices popped up to declare that the protesters were deficient because they had no real analysis of the cause of the crisis and offered no solutions. The obvious response was: so what? Isn’t it the job of professionals in politics and government to provide those things?

The Fight to Save Public Education

duncan obama

Shamus Cooke: The first battle tactic against public education was to starve it. Politicians have consistently lowered taxes on corporations and the rich for the past three decades, thereby lowering state revenues that have created the budget crises in nearly every state. Consequently, public education is in a state of shell shock.

From Oxy to Encino: Making Friends and Creating Waves

slave-to-media

If you’ve glanced at the LA Progressive recently, you know that our weekend last week was consumed with the media workshop at Occidental College, which this magazine sponsored and which Sharon and I helped organize. We learned a bit, met some interesting folks, and had a blast. Called “Local Media for Social Change,” the day-long [...]

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