What’s Happening to the “Human” in Human Services?

bowery

Vivian Rothstein: We seem to be taking the humans out of a system that I thought was organized to make life better for actual people. As the cynics say, human services would be so much easier if it weren’t for the humans.

World Bank: Drastic Reformer Needed to Right a Failing Agenda

world bank

Matt Kavanaugh: The blogsophere and Washington rumor-mill are working overtime right now on the question of who might be the next president of the World Bank.

Homeless in Los Angeles

homeless man in los angeles

Jerry Drucker: In all of Los Angeles County, except for Glendale, Pasadena and Long Beach, which conduct their own census counts, the 2011 census count of the homeless was 51,340, 3% less than 2009 at 52,931.

Geneva Diary: In Search of the Voice of the South

geneva united nations

Vijay Prashad: What you have now is sullenness with most of the world defensive and annoyed with the arrogance of the United States and the other members of the Group of Seven (mainly Britain and France).

Famine Strikes Again: Will America Respond?

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William Lambers: East Africa is in the throes of famine. U.S. relief efforts over the past century show that we have always been willing to respond to humanitarian crises.

Remember Our Homeless Gay Youth This Holiday

homeless gay youth

Rev. Irene Monroe: many of our LGBTQ youth, myself included as once a homeless youth, do not really have a home to go to where they can sit at the family table and be fully out — or if out, fully accepted.

We Ignore Our Infrastructure at Our Peril

carl-zimring

Carl Zimring: The tragedy in San Bruno should draw our attention to infrastructure. Millions of homes across the U.S. are woven together in networks.

Replacing International Oppression with International Aid

President John F. Kennedy urging University of Michigan students to support and join the Peace Corp in 1960.

Lawrence Wittner: So why should humanitarian aid be extraordinary? Why not make it routine? Long before the earthquake, Haitians were the poorest people in the hemisphere, suffering from widespread hunger, disease, and illiteracy. Could not the United States — the richest nation in the world with a public whose major anxieties (to judge from the vast attention given to weight loss) seem to result from over-eating — manage to share a bit of its affluence by regularly providing food aid to starving Haitians?