Who Owns Haiti’s Future?

regine barjon

Georgianne Nienaber: Haiti was also stopped dead in her tracks, and for those who follow progress, or lack thereof in the tiny country, many questions remain about foreign aid that has translated into foreign control over Haiti’s destiny.

Sex for Work in Haiti

ayiti canal

Georgianne Nienaber: Could it be true that transactional sex, kickbacks, and other “favors” are de facto requirements for Haitians applying for work that is funded by USAID?

Haitians Know What They Want

Regine Barjon bill clinton

Georgianne Nienaber: Barjon was the only panelist who forcefully and directly championed the Haitian people, acting as the conscience of the hearing, just as she did in March 2010, less than six weeks after the earthquake

Time to Rebrand Haiti’s Tent Cities as Tomas Approaches

haiti

Georgianne Nienaber: Haiti’s Potemkin village, the Camp Corail-Cesselesse relocation camp, is not safe. With the approach of Tomas, which is morphing daily from tropical storm to hurricane and back again, Haitian officials are urging the 7,850 residents of its flagship camp to evacuate and “find different locations.”

Haiti: “Americans Can See Exactly the Way We Live”

Haiti earthquake recovery

Georgianne Nienaber: Writing about the shattered hopes and dreams of the Haitian people is like trying to describe the movements of a symphony to a hearing-impaired person. How does one separate the elements of the whole, the hundreds of conversations, pleas, and stories that assault the senses, while explaining to an indifferent world that they must open their eyes because the cries of the Haitian people are certainly falling on deaf ears?

21st Century Racism on UC San Diego’s Campus

Noose

Anthony Samad: For the past five weeks, one of the ugliest episodes of racism in recent years (before the Tea Partiers started spittin’ on people and calling Congress people “Nig**rs” and “Fag**ts” at the Congressional health care vote last weekend) has been playing out on a campus of one of the nation’s largest publicly funded university systems.

Haiti: Time for an NGO Police?

2010-03-20-keenan_1

Georgianne Nienaber: Keenan is especially critical of NGOs that “overstate what they have done since the quake. They want their names stamped all over this (disaster).” What she says is true. The logos of international “charitable” organizations are more numerous than the number of tents in the IDP camps. Make no mistake about it charity is “corporate business” in Haiti.

LA Progressive: 28 February to 6 March 2010

Articles by Carl Bloice, Carl Matthes, Rev. Irene Monroe, Tracy Emblem, Sherwood Ross, Andrea Christina Nill, Jim Cullen, Shamus Cooke, Ed Rampell, Sherwood Ross, Robert Reich, Berry Craig, Paul Hogarth, Ed Rampell, Georgiianne Nienaber, Charley James, Andrea Christina Nill, Bob Letcher, Walter Moss, and Dick Price

Help Provide Missing Haiti Coverage

Haiti-Georgianne

Dick Price: Next week, Georgianne Nienaber departs on a 12-day investigative research trip to Haiti where she will look to fill in gaps in the mainstream media’s news coverage while also providing emergency medical assistance to rural Haitians. As she works with Haitian human rights organizations to develop story ideas, she also invites LA Progressive readers to contribute their thoughts on where else she might look.

Dollars for Death, Pennies for Life

Helmand Refugee Camp (photo by Fardin Waezi)

Norman Solomon: While commanders in Afghanistan were launching what the New York Times called “the largest offensive military operation since the American-led coalition invaded the country in 2001,” the situation in Haiti was clearly dire.

Calling a Disaster a Disaster

Haiti-disaster

Robert Letcher: For decades until the recent economic “troubles”, middle classes readily bought into the elite-serving argument: if we don’t question the morality of—and possible connections between—extreme poverty and extreme wealth, elites will act to assure that most of us will never be as poor as those poor Haitians (best delivered with a Glenn Beck quiver).

Replacing International Oppression with International Aid

President John F. Kennedy urging University of Michigan students to support and join the Peace Corp in 1960.

Lawrence Wittner: So why should humanitarian aid be extraordinary? Why not make it routine? Long before the earthquake, Haitians were the poorest people in the hemisphere, suffering from widespread hunger, disease, and illiteracy. Could not the United States — the richest nation in the world with a public whose major anxieties (to judge from the vast attention given to weight loss) seem to result from over-eating — manage to share a bit of its affluence by regularly providing food aid to starving Haitians?

Pat Robertson’s Haitian Theodicy

Haiti quake

Irene Monroe: While scientists explain Haiti’s recent natural disaster as an earthquake due to a fault it sits on along the border between two large tectonic plates – the North American plate to the north, and the Caribbean plate to the south – that slowly slide horizontally past each other, Robinson explains the disaster as “Something [that] happened a long time ago in Haiti, and people might not want to talk about it.”

Not Granting Haitian Immigrants Temporary Protection Status After Earthquake Would Be “Not Only Immoral, But Irresponsible”

Haiti's Earthquake

Andrea Christina Nill: Continuing to deport thousands of Haitian immigrants back to their ravaged home country rather than letting them stay in the U.S. to help their families in Haiti get back on their feet is inconsistent with the promises the Obama administration has already made to the people of Haiti.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...