Raising Hotel Workers' Pay

The hotel industry is booming but hotel jobs like housekeeper, cook, bellman, server, bartender, front desk agent, dishwasher, and others often pay at the poverty level further exacerbating poverty in metropolitan areas of high tourism and business travel. According to the US Census Bureau, 20.2 percent of Los Angeles’s total population lives below the federal poverty level. Raising hotel workers' pay can change these statistics. The Raise LA campaign is working to change that. Learn more by clicking the articles below.

L.A. City Council Passes Landmark Hotel Wage Ordinance

Bonin

Joe Rihn: Amid cheers from labor and community supporters, 12 of the 15 Los Angeles City Council members voted Wednesday in favor of an ordinance that will raise the minimum wage for workers in large hotels to $15.37 per hour.

Historic L.A. Wage Vote Tomorrow

Raise LA Vote

Bobbi Murray: On the table: a $15.37 hourly wage for hotel employees at some of the biggest and most lucrative non-unionized hotels in the City of Los Angeles.

More Money, Less Carbon

Better Wages Less Commuting

Walker Foley: People earning less than $25,000 annually made up 34% of car commuters and 48% of carpools in 2013. Not surprisingly, lower wage earners rely more on automobiles to commute further distances to work.

Paid Sick Days Are a Human Right

Paid Sick Days

Melissa Goodman: The ACLU supports the Raise LA campaign because basic economic rights are inextricably intertwined with civil rights and civil liberties. When Californians lack basic economic security – when they are unable to or must struggle to fulfill basic human needs – they cannot fully exercise their civil liberties and civil rights.

Good Pay for LA’s Hotel Workers, Good News for Angelenos

Hotel Worker

Julia Gould: Even though they work for one of the city’s biggest employers, most hotel workers struggle to get by—often forced to work two jobs and rely on public assistance just to make ends meet.

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