Are Love and Good Works Enough?

young and old

Jules Siegel: All in all, let us say that love leading to good works is not necessarily a doomed course; and doomed or not, is good in and of itself. Even if it doesn’t always work out, it is better than hate leading to evil works. And I suppose that is what keeps us going against all odds.

LA Progressive — July 25 to 31, 2010

Articles by Jules Siegel, Wendy Block, Robert Reich, Randy Shaw, Ivan Eland, Michele Waslin, Steve Hochstadt, Tina Dupuy, Norman Soloman, Gene Rothman, Andrea Nill, Randy Shaw, Will Coiley, Michael Sigman, Paul Hogarth, Shamus Cooke, Peter Dreier, Robert Reich, Diane Lefer, Sharon Kyle, Ivan Eland, Matthew Kavanagh, Jonathan David Farley,Rev. Irene Monroe, Georgianne Nienaber, Jerry Drucker, Anthony Samad, Sherwood Ross, Michael Sigman, and Tom Degan

At Home in the World Joyce Maynard

Salinger

Jules Siegel: Coming across as pompous, astoundingly unfeeling, deceptive and defiantly hypocritical, Salinger indoctrinates her with his homeopathically inspired theories about food, teaches her how to induce vomiting in order to avoid absorbing “toxins,” has her share a diet so austere that she stops menstruating, and generally makes himself the absolute center of not only her personal world but also life as we know it. In one scene, commenting scornfully on the Beatles and their Maharishi, he takes rueful credit for having created the Oriental philosophy fad, conveniently ignoring the Transcendentalists, Herman Hesse and Alan Watts, among others.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Visit us on Google+