Haiti: Cholera Down But People Still “Living Like Stray Dogs”

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Georgianne Nienaber: There is mixed news from Haiti in the last few weeks, but all of it reflects a government paralyzed by a combination of foreign meddling, an administration hamstrung by a balky Parliament, and the refusal of foreign donors to make good on pledges made in March 2010.

Sex for Work in Haiti

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Georgianne Nienaber: Could it be true that transactional sex, kickbacks, and other “favors” are de facto requirements for Haitians applying for work that is funded by USAID?

Haitians Know What They Want

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Georgianne Nienaber: Barjon was the only panelist who forcefully and directly championed the Haitian people, acting as the conscience of the hearing, just as she did in March 2010, less than six weeks after the earthquake

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Flooding Scours the Whitewash From Haiti Aid Efforts

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Georgianne Nienaber: Just as Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer tricked the neighborhood boys into paying him to do his work, so have aid agencies funded by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) tricked donors into paying for the whitewashing of Haiti

Haiti Message on UN Responsibility for Importing Cholera

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Ezili Dantò: In a nutshell, the UN imported the deadly cholera disease to Haiti, but blames the fatal injury on the victim’s pre-existing conditions.

Haiti’s New President Facing ‘Housing Apartheid’

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Georgianne Nienaber: For Haiti, it might not matter who wins, but how the new president will address the mammoth challenges facing a nation that suffered a devastating earthquake 14 months ago on January 12, 2010.

Samia Salomon: Pillar of Haiti’s Community Journalism Network

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Georgianne Nienaber: Feminism. It is almost an antiquated term in the United States, but to Salomon, it is her passion and her identity. She wraps her work in its tenets and infuses her actions with its meaning.

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Haiti: After Relief Agencies Leave

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Geergianne Nienaber: OCHA reports that several non-governmental “charity” organizations (NGOs) are about to reduce their activities relating to clean water and sanitation “because of a lack of funding or to focus on longer term strategies.” The problem is that, once introduced into an ecosystem, the cholera bacterium will not go away, even if the relief organizations do so.

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Vodou’s Acceptance of Gays

Erzulie Dantor

Rev. Irene Monroe: Misconstrued by racist images, of zombies rising from graves, jungle drums, orgiastic ceremonies ritualizing malevolent powers of black magic, and engaging in cannibalism, by today’s popular culture images courtesy of Hollywood’s and New Orleans’ tourism industries, Vodou is a persecuted religion.

Haiti: Searching for Empathy

Georgianne Nienaber: ow, Haiti is bleeding more profusely, and those same international interests are scrambling to dress the wound, but not cure the infection that threatens to turn cancerous, if it has not already.

Think Tank Report: Haiti’s Election “Fatally Flawed”

Study Summary by CEPR

Georgianne Nienaber: CEPR supports claims from candidates, the Haitian press, and other observers that the election was plagued by fraud.The election is so fatally flawed as to nullify any possible attempt by “professional observers to certify the election results,” said Mark Weisbrot, CEPR co-director and co-author of the report.

Port-au-Prince Still Buried Under Rubble of Competing NGOs

Port-au-Prince

Georgianne Nienaber: Honestly not wanting to be cynical and sincerely wanting these programs to succeed–looking at the organizations that “benefit” from the Clinton Bush Fund–one sees the list of usual suspects of foreign NGOs and religious organizations.

Haiti: Street Testimonies

Ezili Danto: Today it hurts me to give voice to what I am hearing. There’s just hopelessness, despair or maybe it’s my Western programming that can’t take this.

Fighting Cholera While OCHA Says 400,000 at Risk

haiti cholera epidemic

Georgianne Nienaber: New estimates by the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization indicate a possibility that the contagion could eventually affect 400,000 people.

Haiti: Ground Truthing Cholera in Mirebalais

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Georgianne Nienaber: In very worrisome news Tuesday, the Haitian Health Ministry estimated that the cholera outbreak in Haiti is resulting in an average of 32 deaths every 24 hours since the epidemic began on October 20

Haiti: Cholera Outbreak Metaphor for No Accountability

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Georgianne Nienaber: It will be astounding to see the media coverage of this event, should it unfold in all its potential horror, but where has the media been since the six-month anniversary in July?

Bill Clinton Puts Influential Muscle Behind Agricultural Production in Haiti

BioTek's Regine Simon Barjon with Former President of the United States, co-chair of the IHRC, and UN Special Envoy for Haiti Bill Clinton at the Darbonne Sugar Mill near Leogane, Haiti on Aug. 6th, 2010 (courtesy Clinton TwitterPic)

Georgianne Nienaber: Given the huge remaining humanitarian and economic crisis facing Haiti, it is puzzling that mainstream media in the United States short-changed coverage of former President Bill Clinton’s early August visit to Leogane. The symbolism is significant, considering that Leogane and the nearby village of Fayette are at the epicenter of the 7.0 quake.

“Stop Feeding on Haiti’s Suffering”

Going home.

Georgianne Nienaber: Haiti is not waving at America. Haiti has the professional expertise to help itself, if only given the opportunity and monetary support to do so. Yes, accountability is needed, but for USAID to suggest that “aid professionals” are the only entities that can accomplish this is not true. Haiti is not an abandoned infant, needing a savior. Abandoned by the international banking community, yes, but fully capable of taking care of her people if given the resources to do so.

Haiti: “Americans Can See Exactly the Way We Live”

Haiti earthquake recovery

Georgianne Nienaber: Writing about the shattered hopes and dreams of the Haitian people is like trying to describe the movements of a symphony to a hearing-impaired person. How does one separate the elements of the whole, the hundreds of conversations, pleas, and stories that assault the senses, while explaining to an indifferent world that they must open their eyes because the cries of the Haitian people are certainly falling on deaf ears?

Voices From the Camps in Haiti: “We Don’t Know What Will Happen”

haiti camps

Georgianne Nienaber: In an unbelievable lack of planning and haphazard distribution of “aid,” a Potemkin Village of white tents courtesy of USAID’s implementing partners, World Vision and OXFAM, now adjoins Camp Canaan. Look beneath the surface of this flagship Haitian government project and one realizes that the residents of “Camp Corail” are really no better off than the residents of Camp Canaan, except for the fact that their tents do not leak–so far.

Misery, Fear, Loss, and Confusion in Haiti Four Months After the Quake

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Georgianne Nienaber: As she knelt with her back to the writer, the Grandmother stopped the smoothing, stopped the straightening, and grew very quiet. Her shoulders began to heave and it was obvious she was wracked with sobs. The task was hopeless and the Creole cries were soft at first and then became a wail. Not knowing what else to do, the writer sat down in the water and touched the back of the elegant Grandmother.

The First Disease Forecasting Center in the World… For Haiti

Dr. Jim Wilson: Praecipio was able to rapidly conduct a “radar sweep” using the Internet and by monitoring Twitter feeds across six languages for the island of Hispaniola, which includes the countries of Haiti and Dominican Republic. We knew instantly from media, blogs, and SMS traffic what was being documented in terms of infectious disease. Consultation with peer-reviewed academic literature enabled us to construct a baseline for several diseases of concern and issue the first infectious disease forecast report in the world, for Haiti, on January 17, 2010.

Haiti’s Looming Public Health Crisis: Where’s the Media?

Haiti's healthcare crisis

Georgianne Nienaber: “The problem with public affairs reporting in poor nations is that for the western media there is no news unless horror is ongoing. Real media has vanished.” Let’s hope that the infants in Haiti can miraculously avoid the looming horrors. If they begin dying by the thousands, rest assured mainstream will be there, detailing every last dying breath and the valiant attempts of their celebrity doctors to save lives.

Haiti: Time for an NGO Police?

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Georgianne Nienaber: Keenan is especially critical of NGOs that “overstate what they have done since the quake. They want their names stamped all over this (disaster).” What she says is true. The logos of international “charitable” organizations are more numerous than the number of tents in the IDP camps. Make no mistake about it charity is “corporate business” in Haiti.

LA Progressive Articles: March 14-20, 2010

Articles by Carl Bloice, Randy Shaw. Ivan Eland, Shamus Cooke, Carl Bloice, Ivan Eland, Rev. Irene Monroe, Robert Reich, Randy Shaw, Tracy Emblem, Michael Sigman:, Georgianne Nienaber, Tom Hayden, Sharon Kyle, Joseph Palermo, Berry Craig

Haiti: “All the Resources Are in the Wrong Place”

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Georgianne Nienaber: Relief efforts are limping along. There are thousands of foreign NGOs on the ground, but no overall organized effort to distribute aid. Compounding the problem is the fact that IDP camps are springing up overnight, and rural areas face a different set of problems than those faced in the city of Port-au-Prince.

Haitian Women: Rea Dol vs. the Republic of NGOs

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Georgianne Nienaber: Needs are many. Temporary classrooms are a must, but tents are impossible to come by here. The current school will never be used, but the field is secured at 83 Delmas Road. She needs $20,000 to pay it off completely. Haitian officials have promised tents, but it is doubtful they will arrive.

Haiti’s Fayette Villagers Forgotten at Epicenter

Landslide near Fayette on Momance River

Georgianne Nienaber: While Leogane is completely overrun with NGOs, Fayette gets visits from the occasional scientist, and the only camera lens focused on the village is aboard NASA’s EO-1 satellite. Villagers told us they have not seen any aid workers since the quake. Nestled in fertile, natural surroundings along the Momance River, the local population is self-sufficient. They are not requesting money, food or water, but they do not want to be forgotten, either.

Haiti: Eight Weeks After the Quake and Words Fail

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Georgianne Nienaber: So, the writer does what writers do and steps back, walking alone and searching for vowels and consonants that might describe what is unseen and impossible to understand. Then something happens that challenges the morality and duty of the writer. There is something on the ground that does not fit the pattern of stones and vegetation. A pelvis attached to a spinal column is lying in the open. Pieces of ribs, a wrist and a forearm are nearby. The writer knows it is human but wants it to be something else. It is familiar and something she has seen before.

LA Progressive Articles: January 31 to February 6, 2010

Articles by Andrea Christina Nill, Emily Spence, Carl Matthes, Carl Bloice, Randy Shaw, Joseph Palermo, Rev. Irene Monroe, Norman Solomon, Robert Reich, Paul Hogarth, Ira Chernus, Sherwood Ross, Ron Wolff, Steve Ybarra, Georgianne Nienaber:, John Gallogly, Berry Craig, Gil Troy, Wendy Block, Joseph Palermo, and David A. Love.

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