Prisons or Higher Education, Which Do We Fund?

Incarceration timeline

Sharon Kyle: Either large segments of the American population suddenly decided to engage in criminal activity or there were changes in sentencing law and prison policy that dramatically increased America’s prison population. Whatever the reason, states are spending more on prisons and less on higher education.

Friday Feedback: Prison Reform

Friday Feedback: People are understandably appalled when violent offenders get early release and go on to commit horrendous crimes, including the recent murder of Chelsea King for which a parolee has been arrested. What is less understood is that thousands of people — including juveniles as young as 13 — are being handed life sentences, including life without any possibility of parole.

LA Progressive Articles: March 7 to 14, 2010

Articles from Dick Price, Bob Letcher, Tim Gatto, Ed Rampell, Anthony Asadullah Samad, Paul Loeb, Tom Hall, Tim Wise, Michelle Alexander, David A. Love, Wendy Block, Rev. Irene Monroe, Andrea Nill, Mario Solis-Marich, Georgianne Nienaber, Randy Shaw, Bob Letcher, Paul Hogarth, Robert Reich, Berry Craig, Randy Shaw, Ron Wolff, Adam Eran, Catherine Allgor, Robert Reich, Joseph Palermo, Shamus Cooke,

First Solve Prison Crisis, Then Fix California’s Budget

Gary Gilmore

Dick Price: To get a handle on the damage California’s current approach to incarceration is having on its citizens, consider this: In a recent 23-year period, California erected 23 prisons—one a year, each costing roughly $100 million dollars annually to operate, with both Democratic and Republican governors occupying the statehouse—at the same time that it added just one campus to its vaunted university system, UC Merced.

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