Racism

The articles in this category deal with Institutional racism. It is here that you find discussions about the kind of racism that continues to operate relentlessly on its own, like a machine, in spite of the intentions of people of good will. De facto racism, silent racism, covert racism, microaggresive behavior, implicit bias, there are lots of names for what we continue to battle in the United States - racially based unearned advantages and disadvantages. We encourage readers to join the conversation. Please peruse the articles and comment. You're sure to find lots of differenct perspectives.

Casual Racism v. Institutionalized Racism

Institutionalized Racism

Tina Dupuy: We’re less willing to talk about or even acknowledge institutionalized racism as a real thing. A word is easy to rally and tweet against: the long-term systematic subjugation of a people based on their skin color is…well…not as easy to solve with a catchy hashtag.

Progressives Taught Us What Not to Do

Reversing Inequality

David Huyssen: Progressives never realized the full potential of the regulatory state to lessen inequality because they were too busy trying to change the behavior of the working class through educational reform, racist moral crusades in low-income neighborhoods, and empathy-building exercises.

Military Bans Nappy Hair

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Rev. Irene Monroe: With African American servicewomen enlisting in the military at higher rates than their white, Asian and Latina sisters to serve and die for our country, the last thing the military should be squawking about is their hair.

No Sympathy for Shelly Sterling

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Dave Zirin: By coddling Ms. Sterling, Doc Rivers sends a message that the hounding of thousands of the poorest residents in Los Angeles is a lesser crime than being caught on audio being a racist jackass.

Donald Sterling Is Los Angeles

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Joe Mathews: The racism heard on the leaked tape may have been news around the country, but Sterling’s discrimination against renters in his apartment buildings, and his anti-black, anti-Mexican, and misogynist views, were well-known facts of Los Angeles life for 30 years.

Letter from a Birmingham Jail: Reading As a Remedy for Racial Bias

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Charles D. Hayes: I grew up with a sheltered worldview much in agreement with the same politics and prejudices of my community. It was a world of black-and-white notions of morality, and it was a literal interpretation of racial superiority that white was right. But reading Martin Luther King’s Letter From a Birmingham Jail changed my reality.