EU Showdown: Greece Takes on the Vampire Squid

Greek Economic Crisis

Ellen Brown: Greece and the troika (the International Monetary Fund, the EU, and the European Central Bank) are in a dangerous game of chicken. The Greeks have been threatened with a “Cyprus-Style prolonged bank holiday” if they “vote wrong.” But they have been bullied for too long and are saying “no more.”

The Global Bankers’ Coup

Financial Stability Board

Ellen Brown: “Bail-in” is not the law yet, but the G20 governments will be called upon to adopt the FSB’s resolution measures when the proposal is finalized after taking comments in 2015.

Cyprus-Style Bail-ins to Hit Depositors AND Pensioners

European Banking Crisis

Ellen Brown: Wall Street-based pension fund managers, although losing enormous sums in the last crisis, will not necessarily act more prudently going into the next one. All the pension funds are struggling with commitments made when returns were good, and getting those high returns now generally means taking on risk.

Would Scottish Independence Mean Economic Sovereignty?

Scotland

Ellen Brown: Perhaps the Scots will blaze a trail for economic sovereignty in Europe, just as North Dakotans did in the U.S. A publicly-owned bank could help Scotland take control of its own economic destiny, by avoiding unnecessary debt to a private banking system that has become a burden to the economy rather than a pillar in its support.

Time to Rain Money on Main Street

Give Money to Main Street

Ellen Brown: When an article appears in Foreign Affairs, the mouthpiece of the policy-setting Council on Foreign Relations, recommending that the Federal Reserve do a money drop directly on the 99%, you know the central bank must be down to its last bullet.

Cry for Argentina: Fiscal Mismanagement, Odious Debt or Pillage?

Argentine Fiscal Crisis

Ellen Brown: Argentina has now taken the US to The Hague for blocking the country’s 2005 settlement with the bulk of its creditors. The issue underscores the need for an international mechanism for nations to go bankrupt. Better yet would be a sustainable global monetary scheme that avoids the need for sovereign bankruptcy.