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Larry Aubry

Larry Aubry

Larry Aubry was an activist who focused his work on improving conditions for dangerously disenfranchised Black communities through coalition-building with other cultural and ethnic groups. His activism was spurred by his early experiences at Fremont High School in the 1940s, where he was one of the first Blacks to attend. As Charlotta Bass also documents in her book, Forty Years: Memoirs from the Pages of a Newspaper, Blacks were being hung in effigy from trees outside the school to protest integration. Aubry went on to become a social service worker, mainly in probation, but in a long career of community activism, he was also a member of the Inglewood School Board; vice-president and education chair of the L.A. NAACP; a board member of Multicultural Collaborative and the Inglewood Coalition for Drug and Violence Prevention; vice-president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute; and a member of the Reparations United Front and the Committee to Save King Drew Medical Center. He began writing for the L.A. Sentinel in the early 1980s, and was honored by the Southern California Library in 2005 in recognition of a lifetime of being unafraid to speak the truth, building bridges, and working to bring justice to Los Angeles through his outstanding journalism as a columnist for the Sentinel. Larry Aubry began contributing to the LA Progressive in the final years of his life. He passed away on May 16, 2020.