Does War Have a Future?

The Future of War

*+-Lawrence Wittner: The United States is a very wealthy nation, but when it spends 55 percent of its annual budget on the military, as it now does, it is almost inevitable that its education, health care, housing, parks and recreational facilities, and infrastructure will suffer.

Inequality Deepens on University Campuses

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*+-Lawrence Wittner: As the incomes of the 25 best-paid public university presidents soared, the livelihoods of their faculty deteriorated. This deterioration resulted largely from the fact that tenured and tenure-track faculty were replaced with adjuncts and contingents.

The Limits of Military Power

Is Military Power Useful

*+-Lawrence Wittner: The lengthy and costly Vietnam War led to a humiliating defeat for the United States — not because the U.S. government lacked enormous military advantages, but because, ultimately, the determination of the Vietnamese to gain control of their own country proved more powerful than U.S. weaponry.

Greatest Immediate Threat to Mankind

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*+-Lawrence Wittner: Today, some 17,300 nuclear weapons remain in the arsenals of nine nations, and their use would not only dramatically exacerbate climate disruption, but would create almost unbelievable horrors caused by their enormous blast, immense firestorms, and radioactive contamination.

America’s Peace Ship

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*+-Lawrence Wittner: Veterans for Peace hope to take the ship back to sea in 2014 on its new mission: “educating future generations on the importance of the ocean environment, the risks of nuclear technology, and the need for world peace.”

Inequality on Campus

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*+-Underpaid Adjunct Professors: Underpaid adjunct faculty now comprise an estimated 74 percent of America’s college teachers.

Raise the Minimum Wage

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*+-Lawrence Wittner: The richest nation on earth has millions of full-time employees earning poverty-level wages while giant corporations and the wealthy amass trillions of dollars at these workers’ expense.

GE Too Big To Jail

General Electric

*+-Lawrence Wittner: Can the world’s biggest corporations act with impunity? When it comes to General Electric (GE) — the eighth-largest U.S. corporation, with $146.9 billion in sales and $13.6 billion in profits in 2012 — the answer appears to be “yes.”