robert reichRobert B. Reich is Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley. He has served in three national administrations, most recently as secretary of labor under President Bill Clinton. He has written eleven books, including The Work of Nations, which has been translated into 22 languages; the best-sellers The Future of Success and Locked in the Cabinet, and his most recent book, Supercapitalism. His articles have appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Mr. Reich is co-founding editor of The American Prospect magazine.

The Upsurge in Uncertain Work

Gig Economy

Robert Reich: On demand and on call – in the “share” economy, the “gig” economy, or, more prosaically, the “irregular” economy – the result is the same: no predictable earnings or hours.

Ending Corporate Welfare in California

Ending Corporate Welfare

Robert Reich: California’s property taxes are already much lower than the national average. So even if corporations pay their full share, they’re still getting a great deal.

The Fraud of the New “Family-Friendly” Work

Family-Friendly Work

Robert Reich: These new policies apply only to a tiny group considered “talent” – highly educated and in high demand. They’re getting whatever perks firms can throw at them in order to recruit and keep them.

The Outrageous Ascent of CEO Pay

CEO Pay

Robert Reich: In 1965, CEOs of America’s largest corporations were paid, on average, 20 times the pay of average workers. Now, the ratio is over 300 to 1.

The Revolt Against the Ruling Class

American Ruling Class

Robert Reich: Political insiders don’t see that the biggest political phenomenon in America today is a revolt against the “ruling class” of insiders that have dominated Washington for more than three decades.

Hillary’s Glass-Steagall

Hillary Glass Steagall

Robert Reich: People who believe Hillary Clinton is still too close to Wall Street will not be reassured by her position on Glass-Steagall. Many will recall that her husband led the way to repealing Glass Steagall in 1999 at the request of the big Wall Street banks.

How to Punish Bank Felons

Punish Bank Felons

View image | gettyimages.com hat exactly does it mean for a big Wall Street bank to plead guilty to a serious crime? Right now, practically nothing. But it will if California’s Santa Cruz County has any say. First, some background. Five giant banks – including Wall Street behemoths JPMorgan Chase and Citicorp – recently pleaded […]

Anticipatory Bribery

Lobbying Scandals

View image | gettyimages.com ashington has been rocked by the scandal of J. Dennis Hastert, the longest-serving Republican speaker in the history of the U.S. House, indicted on charges of violating banking laws by paying $1.7 million (as part of a $3.5 million agreement) to conceal prior misconduct, which turns out to have been child […]

Whatever Happened to Antitrust?

Antitrust Laws

Robert Reich: We’re now in a new gilded age of wealth and power similar to the first gilded age when the nation’s antitrust laws were enacted. But unlike then, today’s biggest corporations have enough political clout to neuter antitrust.