Skip to main content
Tishaura Jones

Tishaura Jones

Last week, St. Louis made the news. This time, it was good news. The city made history with the election of its first Black female mayor. Tishaura Jones will succeed the city’s first white female mayor, whose incompetence and lack of leadership resulted in numerous negative headlines over the course of her less than stellar one term.

For those of us who’ve been fighting for Black political power, making history was a footnote. We’ve been organizing around a serious, political strategy that transcends Black faces in high places. Building a multi-racial, intergenerational movement in St. Louis is about more than one candidate. It’s about intentional progress for a city mired in a white supremacist, patriarchal past.

It is exactly why the election is believed to be a turning point for the city. It was a vote for breaking with the backward, racist status quo which has been choking the life and promise out of the city, marginalizing its Black population politically and economically.

Building a multi-racial, intergenerational movement in St. Louis is about more than one candidate. It’s about intentional progress for a city mired in a white supremacist, patriarchal past.

Tishaura Jones is no neophyte to politics. Her father, Virvus Jones, served as an alderman, the city assessor and city comptroller. Tishaura also has three offices under her public service belt. She was a state representative, city treasurer and now, mayor. Neither of the Joneses is cut from bureaucratic cloth, both have been unapologetically pro-Black community.

Scroll to Continue

Recommended Articles

In the seven years since the Ferguson Uprising, our social justice movement has matured and strengthened. The region has become more politically conscious, more engaged and more demanding of transformative change. It has swept a number of progressive Black candidates into office like St. Louis County Prosecutor Wes Bell, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner and Congresswoman Cori Bush. We passed a minimum wage increase and Medicare Expansion and beat back a Right-to-Work law.

Implementing that agenda means changing the faces of those who have been misrepresenting and disregarding us. We are getting rid of the weeds - regardless of race or gender - so that the flowers of equity, inclusion and transparency can bloom.

Tishaura Jones will inherit a hot mess as the new mayor. On top of a deadly pandemic, Jones faces a hostile police department, record homicides, population loss and neighborhood destabilization. Structural racism and all of its props are formidable obstacles. Her first 100 Days will be a sobering testament to her commitment and skills.

jamala rogers 210

It will also be a challenge for Jones’ supporters to exhibit our patience and endurance. We will have to work hard to strengthen our movement to protect our hard-fought gains. It is becoming a bodacious, powerful force that will continue to expand as we implement The People’s agenda in the crucible of democracy.

Jamala Rogers
BlackCommentator