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I'm so glad Sharon decided to revive LA Progressive's polling series this weekend. The response has been huge, at least by our standards, and telling.

Sanders Democratic Convention

Bernie All The Way? Absolutely!—Dick Price

Launched yesterday, the poll shows that LA Progressive's readers overwhelmingly want Bernie Sanders to take his campaign all the way to the Democratic Party's National Convention in Philadelphia in late July.

Given that LAP has formally endorsed Bernie Sanders, taking an editorial stance that heavily favors the Vermont senator, it's not surprising that 96 percent of respondents want Sanders to continue running, with just 4% wanting him to throw in the towel.

What is surprising, though, is that as of Sunday morning—a scant 26 hours after we published the poll—412 people have voted and 58 have commented. That's a yuuuuge response for our magazine, especially as Saturday is usually a dead day for readership.

What is surprising, though, is that as of Sunday morning—a scant 26 hours after we published the poll—412 people have voted and 58 have commented. That's a yuuuuge response for our magazine, especially as Saturday is usually a dead day for readership.

More telling, though, is the depth of the responses. Like Sharon and I, many LAP readers are deeply engaged in Bernie's "revolution." Teresa commented for many of us:

"Those who support Bernie Sanders realize that he is a once in a lifetime politician who will try to bring about a society, with our help, based on economic equality, social and environmental responsibility, and a respect for the dignity of all. I for one am tired of living under the tyranny of a corrupt, two-party system that cares only about serving the rich and powerful that control it."

Early in the Sanders campaign, when Sharon and I were doing our Internet radio show, we invited the show's producer, Richard, to appear as a guest to talk about the coming election. This was after the big 27,000-person rally for Bernie in downtown LA last summer, but before any actual caucus or primary. Early days.

Right out of the box when the mikes went live, Richard jabbed me with what has become a standard Clinton camp challenge: "But will you vote for Hillary in November?"

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I was affronted, as I have continued to be when conversation heads down this rat hole.

"Are you telling me I'm free to play in my sandbox for now, but I'm going to have to hitch up my pants and fall in line eventually," I thought.

Although I had already given my heart to the first candidate in living memory who wanted what I want for America -- single-payer healthcare, much less military adventuring, a much fairer economic system, fat cat money out of politics -- I was still struggling to keep an open mind, at least for our readers' sake.

And I thought then, as I think now, that there will be plenty of time to decide what to do about a Hillary Clinton candidacy should she win the nomination. No need to rush that decision.

So, like the mature person I ever am, I picked up my shovel and threw a load of sand Richard's direction: "Right, will you vote for Bernie when he gets the nomination?"

Most of our poll's respondents have the better of me on the maturity front. I encourage you to read their responses—and contribute your own. Here are excerpts from a couple I especially liked:

Ken Minault: "Bernie’s impact on the political scene and electoral politics is enormous, and probably permanent. I don’t like any suggestion that he should give up because of the media nonsense about the “delegate math.” That math has nothing to do with the influx of young voters into the process—unprecedented in my life."

Paul: "Why ever not? Some people need to be a part of his message, others need to hear it. I have not given up hope that he will be the nominee. But if he is not, I urge him—all of us—to make support of Clinton contingent on commitment to some of our values in specific form as planks in the campaign."

dick-price-hat

We'd also welcome your suggestions for future polls.

Dick Price|
Editor, LA Progressive