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"He is a demagogue, who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator." -- British theoretical physicist Steven Hawking.

Europeans Fear Trump

Trump Couldn't Get Elected Dog Catcher in Europe—Berry Craig

"Look towards the Republican Party in America and shudder. 'Make America Great Again!' cries a man who is fascist in all but name….He has the temperament of an unstable nightclub bouncer, jeers at violence when it breaks out at his rallies and wears his disdain for women and minorities with pride. God help America. God help us all." – J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter books

In a now famous leaked email, former Secretary of State Colin Powell dissed Donald Trump as "a national disgrace and an international pariah.” (He also took some unkind cuts at Hillary Clinton and other political bigwigs.)

Trump, the GOP presidential hopeful, couldn’t get elected dog catcher in Europe, if a June Pew Research Center survey is on the money.

A scant 9 percent of Europeans polled believe Trump will “do the right thing regarding world affairs,” according to the survey, which was conducted in Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Greece, Poland and Hungary.

All of those countries but neutral Sweden are U.S. allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

In July, Trump suggested that if he were elected, he might make American military support for NATO member nations conditional on whether they have met their financial obligations to the 67-year-old alliance, whose charter says “armed attack against one or more of them [members] in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all...”

Anyway, 59 percent of Europeans had confidence in Hillary Clinton, Trump's Democratic opponent, to do the right thing in global matters.

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My wife and I spent most of July and part of August in Great Britain, France, Iceland and the Flanders region of Belgium. Based on conversations we had with locals—and a trio of Australians—Trump is a pariah plus.

My wife and I spent most of July and part of August in Great Britain, France, Iceland and the Flanders region of Belgium. Based on conversations we had with locals—and a trio of Australians—Trump is a pariah plus.

English speakers—my college French is long gone and Flemish and Icelandic are Greek to us—echoed comments similar to Hawking and Rowling's.

Oh, Trump is popular with Europe’s David Dukes and David Duke lites. "They should send all of them and their families back to where they came from," a Belgian cabbie groused to us the day after the Nice terror attack.

Big time Brexit booster Nigel Farage campaigned stateside with Trump. Farage was the leader of the reactionary populist UK Independence Party, a better dressed variant of Sir Oswald Mosely’s black-shirted British Union of Fascists from the 1930s.

Marine Le Pen, head of the far-right-wing French National Front, said if she were an American, she’d vote for Trump. The National Front’s antecedents include armed reactionaries who rioted in Paris against the French government in 1934. Many of them eagerly embraced France’s collaborationist, anti-Semitic, pro-Nazi Vichy government in World War II.

A 95-year-old British Tory who as a teenager helped make sandwiches for British troops returning from Dunkirk in 1940, shuddered at the thought of a Trump presidency. So did a sixtyish Icelandic folklorist whose specialty is trolls.

A twentysomething Aussie grad student at the University of Edinburgh was terrified of a Trump presidency. So was a middle-aged farm couple in their sixties from western Australia who traveled halfway around the world to Ypres, Belgium, to see where the husband's grandfather fought a century earlier in World War I.

No doubt, the xenophobes, nativists and bigots who dote on Trump on this side of the Atlantic don’t care that he’s a pariah among European “wimps” and “wusses.” They’re probably glad that so many foreigners disdain macho Donald, who ducked the draft and the Vietnam War in his salad days, as a close encounter of the worst kind.

Berry Craig

“No man is an island/Entire of itself,” Briton John Donne’s famous poem begins. Neither is a country.

Berry Craig

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