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Since new media has placed the Black Lives Matter protests front and center—challenging the notion of American exceptionalism—mainstream media, politicians, and talking heads across all platforms have been quick to criticize the movement for not having a specific set of demands.

m4bl

The Movement for Black Lives—M4BL—Sharon Kyle

Well, that set of demands has been laid out and published online in a platform created by The Movement for Black Lives entitled “A Vision for Black Lives, Policy Demands for Black Power, Freedom & Justice.”

With input from members of Black Lives Matter as well as dozens of other organizations representing thousands of people across this country, The Movement for Black Lives released a comprehensive platform that outlines what a vision for black people.

The Movement for Black Lives is affiliated with the Black Lives Matter Movement but is broader. It is comprised of a coalition of organizations representing thousands of people across the United States. I learned of this coalition shortly after its first convening in 2015—a convening that occurred almost organically in response to the sustained violence enacted by state actors against black people in cities across the country and broadcast widely through the new media.

With input from members of Black Lives Matter as well as dozens of other organizations representing thousands of people across the country, The Movement for Black Lives released a comprehensive platform that provides a roadmap of sorts that would help to make life more fair and equitable for black people.

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In reviewing it, I suggest that the Vision for Black Lives is a vision that, if implemented, would simply put black people on par with the dominant culture. While the vision centers on black communities, the movement states, “We are a collective that centers and is rooted in Black communities, but we recognize we have a shared struggle with all oppressed people.”

They spent over a year talking to grassroots community organizations to gather, assess, digest, and then synthesize the data they gleaned from these many discussions with over 60 organizations.

One of their goals was to provide a set of comprehensive answers to those trying to understand what the Black Lives Matter movement wants. Their vision offers more than mere bandaid solutions and is well worth the read for all who are progressive and sincerely dedicated to making this nation a nation that is for the people.

Sharon Kyle 2013

Dick and I recorded a podcast about the Movement for Black Lives. You can access it just below this article. The LA Progressive will be providing more coverage of this important matter in the weeks to come.

Sharon Kyle
LA Progressive, Publisher