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In the crusade against Communism, otherwise known as the Cold War, the U.S. saw "freedom" as its core strength. Our liberties were contrasted with the repression of our chief rival, the USSR. We drew strength from the idea that our system of government, which empowered people whose individualism was guided by ethics based on shared values, would ultimately prevail over godless centralism and state-enforced conformity. An important sign of this was our belief in citizen-soldiers rather than warriors, and a military controlled by democratically-elected civilians rather than by dictators and strong men.

american core values

Do Americans Still See Freedom and Liberty as Core Strengths?—William J. Astore

Of course, U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War could be amoral or immoral, and ethics were often shunted aside in the name of Realpolitik. Even so, morality was nevertheless treated as important, and so too were ethics. They weren’t dismissed out of hand.

In the name of defeating radical Islamic terrorism, we've become more repressive, even within the USA itself. Obedience and conformity are embraced instead of individualism and liberty.

Fast forward to today. We no longer see "freedom" as a core U.S. strength. Instead, too many of us see freedom as a weakness. In the name of defeating radical Islamic terrorism, we've become more repressive, even within the USA itself. Obedience and conformity are embraced instead of individualism and liberty. In place of citizen-soldiers, professional warriors are now celebrated and the military is given the lion's share of federal resources without debate. Trump, a CEO rather than a statesman, exacerbates this trend as he surrounds himself with generals while promising to obliterate enemies and to revive torture.

In short, we've increasingly come to see a core national strength (liberty, individualism, openness to others) as a weakness. Thus, America's new crusades no longer have the ethical underpinnings (however fragile they often proved) of the Cold War. Yes, the Cold War was often unethical, but as Tom Engelhardt notes at TomDispatch.com today, the dirty work was largely covert, i.e. we were in some sense embarrassed by it. Contrast this to today, where the new ethos is that America needs to go hard, to embrace the dark side, to torture and kill, all done more or less openly and proudly.

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Along with this open and proud embrace of the dark side, America has come increasingly to reject science. During the Cold War, science and democracy advanced together. Indeed, the superior record of American science vis-à-vis that of the Soviet Union was considered proof of the strength and value of democracy. Today, that is no longer the case in America. Science is increasingly questioned; evidence is dismissed as if it’s irrelevant. "Inconvenient truths" are no longer recognized as inconvenient -- they're simply rejected as untrue. Consider the astonishing fact that we have a president-elect who's suggested climate change is a hoax perpetrated by China.

Yesterday, I saw the following comment online, a comment that summed up the new American ethos: "Evidence and facts are for losers." After all, President-elect Trump promised America we’d win again. Let’s not let facts get in the way of “victory.”

That's what a close-minded crusader says. That the truth doesn't matter. All that matters is belief and faith. Obey or suffer the consequences.

https://bracingviews.com/2018/07/17/trump-treason/

Where liberty is eroded and scientific evidence is denied, you don't have democracy. You have something meaner. And dumber. Something like autocracy, kleptocracy, idiocracy. And tyranny.

William J. Astore
Bracing Views

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