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Roy Moore owes his fame and his political career to his defiance of a federal court order to remove the Ten Commandments from his courtroom.

Roy Moore

Just to refresh your memory, in case you haven’t watched Charlton Heston lately, here they are:

1 I am the Lord your God, You shall have no other gods before me.

2 You shall not make any graven images of God.

3 You shall not use the Lord your God's Name in vain.

4 Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it Holy.

5 Honour your father and mother.

6 You shall not kill.

7 You shall not commit adultery.

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8 You shall not steal.

9 You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor

10 You shall not covet.

Moore, and the religious right generally, insist that these commandments are to be taken literally, and that they are more binding than secular law, including the U.S. Constitution.

That a politician would lie about sexual misconduct is not that shocking. What’s shocking is that he’s likely to be elected anyway by an Alabama electorate with a large contingent of religious conservatives.

Yet we now see Moore credibly accused of sexually molesting a 14-year-old girl when he was 32. The accuser, for the many reasons that are so familiar, refrained from making these charges until now, but her story was backed up by friends from that time whom she had told about it. She told her mother only years later. So, overall, there is good reason to believe her.

But Roy Moore, now in the final month of his campaign for the U.S. Senate, denies the charge, even as many Republicans in the Senate have withdrawn their support, even though Mitt Romney has called for him to stand down. It would seem that they believe the accuser (a Republican who voted for Trump, by the way), and not Roy Moore.

So it looks like there’s a plausible case that Moore is lying (i.e., bearing false witness) and that he actually lusted after (coveted) this young woman. That’s two Commandments right there. It seems he was single at the time, so can’t be accused of adultery.

That a politician would lie about sexual misconduct is not that shocking (though especially piquant coming from a defender of the Ten Commandments). What’s shocking is that he’s likely to be elected anyway by an Alabama electorate with a large contingent of religious conservatives. These folks seem to be really strong on enforcing the Ten Commandments and other elements of fundamentalist Christianity, if the target is those nasty liberals and Democrats.

When it comes to themselves and their own (like Roy Moore), they seem to be more into God’s Grace and the Forgiveness of Sins. It’s all relative, isn’t it? There’s no mention of hypocrisy in the Ten Commandments.

john peeler

John Peeler

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