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Orange County Immigrant Rights


Each week, LA Progressive’s editors pick what they regard as a particularly insightful comment from one of our readers, both to draw attention to one particular reader’s thoughts and to encourage more readers to weigh in with their opinions. This week’s pithy "Feedback Friday" response comes from Joe Weintein, who commented on the article by Joe Mathews's, Orange County Still Acts Like Mayberry R.F.D. It Needs to Get Real on Immigrants and the Homeless

" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">“Orange County Still Acts Like Mayberry R.F.D. It Needs to Get Real on Immigrants and the Homeless”.

Mathews raises good questions but from a very inadequate perspective.

Orange County (OC), for all its differences from other places, is yet in essential and large measure much like the rest of California – or the USA – or indeed the world.

In OC as elsewhere, many folks – basically decent, tolerant and liberal-minded folks – don’t see the point of building costly and perhaps disruptive band-aids, of only temporary adequacy, to cover what are merely the currently visible symptoms of an ongoing and ever-growing globally injurious and unsustainable process which will continue to increasingly bruise the world because it continues to be tolerated and even promoted by official policies.

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This unsustainable process is unchecked, uncontrolled human population growth.

That fact should not be news to us residents of Southern California, the home base of the late and prophetic UCSB Prof. Garrett Hardin.

The repeated failure (with few exceptions outside China), to act even minimally to curb and control population, has global impact, but especially in those currently relatively fortunate locations, such as OC or elsewhere in California, to which immigration – from within or without the national borders, and ‘legal’ or otherwise – is relatively unhampered. .

Yes, OC, like other places in California and the USA, now contains notable numbers of new immigrants and homeless and new seekers of ‘affordable’ housing. No matter how decently, and with what great expense, TODAY’S OC residents in these categories are treated and housed, the result will be a band-aid: because the process that drives the creation of ever more FUTURE new immigrants – and homeless and new seekers of ‘affordable’ housing – will not thereby be addressed.

OC residents have good reason to infer that going to the expense of making OC life better for current resident new immigrants and homeless and new seekers of affordable housing will simply increase the future attraction of OC to yet more.

In fact, new immigrants and homeless and new seekers of affordable housing are already attracted especially to OC and some other coastal California areas (as versus other places in the USA, let alone on Planet Earth) precisely for the reasons that other folks are attracted: good weather, a good economy, and a relatively high standard of public infrastructure and services.

OC residents have good reason to infer that going to the expense of making OC life better for current resident new immigrants and homeless and new seekers of affordable housing will simply increase the future attraction of OC to yet more. Locally in OC, the problem will be abetted, not solved.

It may be ‘politically incorrect’ (‘not nice’) to suggest but: instead of trying to house all these impacted current OC (or LA) residents in OC (or LA) the more responsible course (until we have more effective global population control) would be to use the same funds to settle and employ them in the Midwestern and ‘rust belt’ towns which have reasonable economies, lower living and housing costs, and – thanks to declining population – would actually welcome new residents.