Skip to main content

How do you cheer up a friend after something terrible happens to them? Life can often throw curveballs and an unexpected disappointment can put us in a funk. Your friend may have lost a job; or the love of their life left them; or they didn’t get the promotion they deserved; or they flunked a college admission test.

Cheer Up a Friend

While you may not know what to do, with no clue how to fix the calamity or help them recover from the loss, there’s still plenty you can do to help them get back their sunny disposition.

While you may not know what to do, with no clue how to fix the calamity or help them recover from the loss, there’s still plenty you can do to help them get back their sunny disposition.

Pro Tip! The worst thing you could do is to do nothing or to give a pep talk about how they need to quit feeling sorry for themselves and that they need to pick themselves up by their bootstraps.

Here are six ideas on how you can help your friend get some perspective, learn life lessons, and move on with their life.

  • Send a funny card: Funny cards have a way of making us feel better. Sending a card to someone is even easier today. We can do it quickly without leaving the house by sending an eCard with cartoon animations. We feel better after sending a card because they are a way to express affection without fumbling for the right words. When your friend gets your ecards, he or she will instantly appreciate how much you care about their happiness and well-being.
Scroll to Continue

Recommended Articles

  • Relieve physical pain: If your friend has an injury after a fall or sports-related injury, they may experience pain from inflammation. If so, a bottle of CBD oil will calm the inflammation, regardless of the root cause of the injury. If they refuse to take it because they think it’s like marijuana, explain to them that CBD oil does not induce any psychoactive effects.
  • Go out on the town: Sometimes getting out of the house can help someone feel better. Think about your friend’s favorite recreational activities. Do they love spas? Do they have a few favorite places to dine? Is there a movie they’d like to watch that’s out in the theaters right now? By getting them out of the house, they won’t mope around the house all day making themselves miserable. By taking them out on the town, you’ll help them take their mind off their upset.
  • Spend quality time with them: What should you do if your friend doesn’t want to go anywhere or do anything? Sometimes the simplest things are the most effective for recovering from a big disappointment. Why not drop by your friend’s place, hang out, and talk to them? In fact, you don’t even have to say much. Just listen. All you have to do is it be a good listener. This will help them talk through why they are angry, frustrated, or depressed.
  • Go for a walk: Let’s suppose you visit your friend but they don’t want to go out and refuse to talk about their setbacks. You could suggest going for a walk. Perhaps you could walk around the neighborhood or visit a nearby park. The fresh air will help oxygenate them and exercise stimulates serotonin in the brain, the feel-good hormones. If you walk around a beautiful place like a beach or a wooded area, the beauty of nature will have a calming effect.

What all these suggestions have in common is that you’re finding a subtle way to show your support. Maybe your friend feels like a failure after what happened or they feel that they’re just drifting through life without a purpose. This is where you come in--a few positive words from you, words of hope and encouragement, can give them a new perspective.

Lauren Mckenzie