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Even with progressive measures such as Prop 47 and Trump’s support of reduced jail sentences set to help even out crime, there remains a crime problem in California. While many of these problems are native to Trump-voting counties, they remain problems nonetheless, and now property crime is up 11% in LA, demonstrating the scale of the problem. LA has, historically, had generally low rates of property crime.

Impact of Prop 47

Despite crime rates, businesses continue to grow in California. As a state tying together old-school manufacturing and resource extraction with high technology and a burgeoning marijuana industry, California will always have an advantage when it comes to economic growth. As a result businesses are investing more than ever into security; how does that square with political and progressive ideals?

The impact of Prop 47

Proposition 47 is a progressive piece of legislation that has prevented criminals going to state penitentiary s a punishment for petty crimes. Pairing with it is the First Step Act, reported by the WaPo as being designed to vastly reduce draconian prison sentences further. The result of these acts is a far lesser focus on policing when it comes to low level crime, such as simple burglary against business properties.

Greater emphasis is being put on the role of the security guard in businesses and their ability to improve rates of loss prevention and compensation for successful acts of crime.

Businesses are adapting by placing greater focus on their security arrangements. Greater emphasis is being put on the role of the security guard in businesses and their ability to improve rates of loss prevention and compensation for successful acts of crime. Whether this a progressive measure in the long run remains to be seen; however, the removal of excessively punitive prison sentences is certainly good news and may improve communities in the long run.

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Shifting security issues

Even as property crime rises, the prime threat to the modern business is cybercrime. According to the Internet Society, cybercrime already costs the global economy $600 billion every year. What’s more, federal measures are not supportive of pushing a tougher security environment. The Hill reported this month that the US were not pledging to a cybersecurity initiative stemming from France’s President Macron, despite many of the USA and California’s biggest tech companies signing up. California’s Republican party will not offer much in the way of resistance to the administration, given their general support for the administration.

At a local level, far more is being done to help businesses protect themselves. In August 2017, the Los Angeles city cyberlab was created as an opt-in service for concerned businesses, and create a network where SME can be warned ahead of time where threats arise. This is of particular note to small businesses, who rarely have the money and expertise to provide comprehensive security to their products and services. Like the global cybersecurity initiative, some of the state’s biggest companies have submitted to an advisory panel.

Legislative change is, in the long-term, a good thing for LA, but crime rates have trickled upwards in recent months. Tackling the problem requires good usage of that legislation, but also greater involvement from private businesses. Long-term, this theme of cooperation will help the city to flourish – safely.

Cindy Trillo

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