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Learn About the Los Angeles County Homeless Initiative

Cindy Trillo: Since homelessness is at critical mass, the county’s Board of Supervisors created the Homeless Initiative, which includes forty-seven tactics for reaching across community and government boundaries.

In Los Angeles County, fifty-eight thousand people, including children, are officially homeless. In Trump’s America, where one percenters grab lucrative tax breaks and large corporations take precedence over “Dreamers” or the innocent children of illegal immigrants, everything is topsy-turvy, but the county government is trying valiantly to make a difference. L.A. leans democratic and this is a good thing.

Los Angeles County Homeless Initiative

Homelessness is at Critical Mass

The average price of a detached home in Los Angeles County is $675,000 USD, according to stats from Zillow.com. Los Angeles’ most vulnerable residents can’t even hope to own property and the homeless can’t afford the price of even the cheapest rent. They end up on the streets or in encampments. They are always in need and at risk.

Since homelessness is at critical mass, the county’s Board of Supervisors created the Homeless Initiative, which includes forty-seven tactics for reaching across community and government boundaries.

Since homelessness is at critical mass, the county’s Board of Supervisors created the Homeless Initiative, which includes forty-seven tactics for reaching across community and government boundaries. It’s all about helping the poorest segment of the Los Angeles population. In 2015, voters in the county approved over 350 million dollars in funding over the following ten years, to pay for ongoing housing and related services.

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What Is the Action Plan?

This program has many facets and they are prevention, subsidized housing, income increase, case management and services, coordination of systems and affordable housing. In summer of last year, the Board approved “Measure-H-eligible” strategies for the homeless and created plans for implementation of those strategies. At the end of September of last year, the finished plans for implementation were presented to the Board.

According to the New York Times website, funding which develops affordable housing for homeless people is important, but it’s not everything. It doesn’t solve every problem. Even when funding is ample, land is available and good will is present, shelter plans may falter due to opposition in the community. There is still so much to be done and everyone needs to care and help. So, what can you do?

How Can L.A. Residents Help?

Plenty of caring Los Angeles residents already go out of their way to help the homeless (volunteers at the Los Angeles Mission are prime examples) and they don’t take a penny for their hard and dedicated work. However, paying opportunities to help are available through the Los Angeles County Homeless Initiative and though funds for “Measure H”.

Anyone who wants to get into community outreach may apply. Examples of available positions include housing navigators and front-line outreach workers. If want to serve the homeless, but also need to earn a living, one of these positions may be perfect for you.

Cindy Trillo