Just Not Enough Water

woman taking a shower

*+-Kathleen Piene: Every comment from the parade of jackals running for executive office this year, every hypocritical utterance makes me wish the hot water in my shower could run for hours because that’s the only way I can think of to wash the rank nasty off me after being exposed to such filth.

Human Right to Water Bill Passes Senate Committee

new-river

*+-Dan Bacher: More than 11.5 million Californians rely on water from suppliers that experienced at least one violation of State Drinking Water Standards as reported to the Department of Public Health in 2004.

Clean Water and Good Government

drinking-fountain-wide

*+-Steve Hochstadt: Supplying pure water is just one of many essential functions of governments that we all must fund with our taxes. Governments, representing all citizens, were created for just such common purposes.

Three for the Apocalypse

owl

*+-The owl shrugs. The gator slithers across the mud, finds a small fold in the water, slips himself noiselessly under. He rumbles—and the water dances off his back—a symphonette of timpani and bassoons. He rises again with an afterthought.

Hollywood’s Fix for America’s Three and a Half Trillion-Dollar Lobbying Addiction

nomiki konst

*+-Nomiki Konst: The United States of America has a dirty little secret. We’re addicted to a drug. A drug dealt everyday in the halls of Congress, on the streets of Washington, and at the exclusive Georgetown soirees. That drug is corruption, pure and simple. And the dealers are lobbyists. The year 2009 was record breaking for the lobbying industry, mostly due to the health care debate, with total spending on all issues at more than $3.47 billion.

Haiti’s Fayette Villagers Forgotten at Epicenter

Landslide near Fayette on Momance River

*+-Georgianne Nienaber: While Leogane is completely overrun with NGOs, Fayette gets visits from the occasional scientist, and the only camera lens focused on the village is aboard NASA’s EO-1 satellite. Villagers told us they have not seen any aid workers since the quake. Nestled in fertile, natural surroundings along the Momance River, the local population is self-sufficient. They are not requesting money, food or water, but they do not want to be forgotten, either.