1. From my interaction with (non-partisan) Working-Class voters, when Unions mainly “devote their energies to electing Democrats to office”, this demotivates the (non-Union) electorate from supporting the idea of Unions. If Unions continue on this path, they will continue to be diminished into marginalization. 

    Of course Democratic Party faithfuls/ apologists will ardently disagree, but they are so out touch with the average Working-class voter, that their beliefs do not align with this majority of the electorate. Progressives, unlike the (Neo-Liberal) Democrats, should not ignorantly mimic these Dem Party apologists, or they too will become increasingly irrelevant (& also hurt my progress of cultivating a Progressive/ Working-Class non-Democratic Party message that is actually very popular in CA’s Central Valley). 

    Adapt or die. Unions are not adapting. The Democratic Party is adapting by allowing itself to be corrupted by Wall Street interests, which is making them a Right-wing leaning Centrist party thereby leaving the Working-Class with no party to support. This is one of the main reasons why voters are leaving the Dem Party to re-register as No Political Party to become Independents by the hundreds or thousands every month. 

    [On a side note, the GOP is also losing thousands of voters/ members who are becoming Independents.] 

  2. Unions generally tend to treat management as it’s enemy, using coercion against them to force concessions out of them.

    But public unions treat the public as it’s enemy.  They threaten to withhold police and fire protection.  They threaten to shut down the schools.  Here in Chicago the teachers’ union is demanding a 30% raise over the next 3 years!  They can already retire at 55 with a full pension while the people who help fund that pension are fortunate if they can retire at 65.  Public worker unions treat the public (private union members are part of the public, remember) with anger and contempt.  How is it, then, a surprise when the sentiment is finally returned?

  3. So I get your point about the growing bipartisanship of capitalism. And in Louisiana we are certainly feeling the pain of some Democrats in our legislature going over to the dark side in supporting  Governor Bobby Jindal’s agenda to privatize every public service (prisons, retirement systems. . ) squeeze the budget of every public institution (K-12 and higher education. . . ) and influence the vote with intimidation, bribes and bullying. But I don’t get the notion that “turning away from electing democrats” is the solution or has a direct correllation to ending complacency and a belief that our elected representatives actually represent us and by virtue of their election can bring about change. It seems to me that we would be better served educating and motivating the electorate on the realities and to maintain due diligence and a watchdog mentality. Rather than abandoning the Democratic Party or cultivating the false sense of security that “a seat at the table (bloodfeast)” with Republicans or anyone else who abandons our ideals (U.S. Ed. Sec. Arne Duncan – Sen. Mary Landrieu. . . ), we should be doing what the populace does when they are pushed in a corner and have little left but their voices and their power at the polls – stand up, go forth, use our strength in numbers and for me anyway, our belief that our vision for Americans is not only the righteous one but the only viable economic alternative.  

    And it’s time for the Democratic Party in Louisiana to do some weeding in their own garden.  One only has to survey the vote on education and retirement bills this legislative session to identify who those are. The Republicans have done a great job hijacking the “reform” agenda for public education and using it to further their own cause.  Too many democrats, including our current administration in Washington, are asleep at the wheel.  Well, yeah, and a measure of greed and self-service.         

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